Stunning camouflaged boat transformed by a French artist to blend into the coastline

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A French artist has created an incredible camouflaged boat that masquerades as a floating rock.

Julien Berthier, 46, from Paris, used mainly polystyrene and epoxy resin to transform an old ship into what appears to be a rock formation that broke off the coast around Marseille, France.

Stunning footage recorded in June shows the boat – aptly named “The Invisible” or “The Invisible” – heading towards the Mediterranean Sea as spectators record the ship on their phones in amazement.

Stunning images show the boat – aptly named “The Invisible” or “The Invisible” – heading towards the Mediterranean Sea

Julien Berthier (pictured), 46, from Paris, turned an old ship into what appears to be a rock formation that has drifted away from the coast around Marseille, France

Julien Berthier (pictured), 46, from Paris, turned an old ship into what appears to be a rock formation that has drifted away from the coast around Marseille, France

Spectators in another boat can be seen recording the unique ship as it passes by

Spectators in another boat can be seen recording the unique ship as it passes by

M. Berthier poses at the top of his creation L'invisble, which he completed in June of this year

M. Berthier poses at the top of his creation L’invisble, which he completed in June of this year

His painstakingly precise paint job makes it appear like a floating natural rock formation.

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Mr. Berthier is famous for his extravagant designs, having created a “permanently sinking boat” in 2010 which was a fully operational vessel despite its appearance half sunk in the water.

Its latest project started in September 2020, but due to Covid restrictions, the six weeks of solid work was cut short, meaning the boat wasn’t launched until June of this year.

The artist, from Paris, said: “I wanted to create something that encroaches as little as possible on the landscape.

“As an artist these days it can all be about being as strong as possible, standing out as much as possible on Instagram and social media.

M. Berthier (right) with Thomas Mailaender, who helped him transform an old ship (pictured) into L'invisible camouflé

M. Berthier (right) with Thomas Mailaender, who helped him transform an old ship (pictured) into L’invisible camouflé

Mr. Berthier said the rock-like creation took a total of six weeks.

Mr. Berthier said the rock-like creation took a total of six weeks.

The striking rock-camouflaged ship started out as a simple small boat (pictured)

The striking rock-camouflaged ship started out as a simple small boat (pictured)

“With that, I wanted to go in the opposite direction and make sure it merges with the creeks around Marseille.

“When he’s next to the rocks, the boat is really camouflaged against him, almost invisible before he pulls away.

“There is an element of survival. I wanted him to integrate as much as possible with nature.

“We are building fake islands to get land out of water and I wanted to play with another element of that.

“Because of the way he moves around the boat, the scenery is constantly changing.

“You can look at the rocks for a second and when you turn around a second later they have changed in a subtle way.”

Mr. Berthier was the first person invited to take part in a residency organized by his artist colleague Thomas Mailaender for the TUBA Club hotels.

Julien said: “With the Covid restrictions, everything took longer than expected. It was about six weeks of solid work all together.

Love Love being carefully placed in the water in 2010

Love Love being carefully placed in the water in 2010

“I was given an old battered boat. I try to work with second hand materials or things that are about to be destroyed as much as possible.

“Most of the rock is made of polystyrene and epoxy resin. It’s more like a cave inside the boat.

“You can accommodate quite a few people there, but it’s a bit cramped now.

“The center of gravity of the boat has changed since we built it on it, so it can shake a bit too.

“When the water gets a little rough, you feel the waves a lot more.

“There are two entrances in the rock, one to enter at the top and another at the back so you can start the engine.”

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